Time to leave Cunnamulla … and here’s what I’ve learnt

August 14, 2016

Challenging one’s own boundaries leads to a massive development in maturity and independence

Hi everyone,

It’s been a while since I have written in my column and a lot has happened in my absence from blogging!

Where should I start…? Well, big news, I have changed locations of nursing from South West Queensland to North Queensland – Townsville in fact. That’s a major change I know, right!?

A different backdrop to Cunnamulla!
A different backdrop to Cunnamulla!

Why the change?

I’m sure the first question that comes to your mind is why did I change?

So, let me answer that: I changed because North Queensland has more potential for job opportunities.

I could have returned to my hometown of Brisbane. But I am loving the excitement of change and this year has tested my limits. Especially because I have changed twice in approximately six months.

Don’t get me wrong, I have struggled due to an overload of change and lack of confidence in my abilities.

Overall though, I believe that challenging one’s own boundaries leads to a massive development in maturity and independence.

What has living in Cunnamulla taught me?

I learnt a lot from my time as a graduate nurse in Cunnamulla including:

  1. How to extend myself socially. The main means of meeting people in the country involves participating in sporting activities and attending local events. So I did that to connect;
  2. I learnt that we humans can cope with a simple life that is not overruled by technology and where social interaction is normal;
  3. Genuine people do exist and are prevalent in country life! Yes, genuine people do exist in city life but are rare species.… If you do find one or more, don’t let them go, they worth their weight in gold.
I'm here ... in Townsville!
I’m here … in Townsville!

How has Cunnamulla impacted my nursing?

Working rurally has impacted my nursing by giving me a far greater appreciation for the convenience of facilities, equipment, and another professional opinion.

When you go from working at a facility that only has an x-ray machine to the equivalent of a major metropolitan facility, you quickly realise how much you can achieve.

I will miss the companionship and autonomy of rural nursing, and the wonderful warm personalities of my patients.

Next column … Townsville the new adventure!

My next edition will be about my transition to Townsville and the challenges of moving.

 Thanks for reading and wish me luck.

Chloe xxoo

Chloe Gibbs on Facebook
Chloe Gibbs

Our city girl in the country, Chloe Gibbs, is a 23-year-old Brisbane girl who recently graduated as a nurse from Australian Catholic University.


Chloe accepted a nursing graduate position in Cunnamulla to challenge herself professionally and personally.


Her hobbies include horse riding, martial arts, general fitness and her love of food. If you wish to follow her journey connect with Chloe on her Facebook or read her column on She Brisbane.